DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY & METEROLOGY
Welcome to the Department of Geography & Meterology

1.1       BRIEF HISTORY

The programme in Geography and Meteorology has its beginning in 1985/86 academic of the defunct Anambra State University of Technology (ASUTECH).  When the present Anambra State was carved out of the old Anambra State in 1991, the two campuses of the then ASUTECH at Awka and Nnewi were constituted by the Anambra State Edict No. 5 of 1991 into the then Anambra State University, now Nnamdi Azikiwe University.  The bulk of the staff of the then Faculty of Environmental Sciences of ASUTECH opted to move to Anambra State University just before it was taken over by the Federal Government and changed to Nnamdi Azikiwe University.

 

After about eight years, approval for the commencement of the Faculty of Environmental Sciences and subsequently Department of Geography and Meteorology/Environmental Management was obtained in 2001/2002 academic session.

 

In November 2005, the National Universities Commission (NUC’s) accreditation teams visited and accredited the Department among others. In this case, Full Accreditation Status was given by the NUC’s accreditation teams that visited the University.

 

The Senate, at its 125th meeting held on Thursday 21st, February 2008, considered the request to demerge the Department of Geography, Meteorology and Environment Management and decided as follows:

i.          That the Department of Geography, Meteorology and Environment Management be split into two, as follows:

a.         Department of Geography & Meteorology

b.         Department of Environmental Management

ii          That the effective date of the split be 2007/2008 academic year.

 

Consequently, the Vice-Chancellor appointed an Ag. Head of Department to the new Department.

 

1.2       THE PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVE OF THE PROGRAMME

The philosophy and mission statement underlying the programme of Geography and Meteorology is to produce graduates imbued with the ability to acquire appropriate knowledge to make their contribution to the development of Nigeria, Africa and the Global Community.  This is to be achieved by equipping the students with a broad foundation and specialized knowledge in the field of environmental sciences in general and in the various sub-fields of Geography and Meteorology in particular.  Also to prepare them to meet the human and natural resources need of a developing society and develop in them entrepreneurial knowledge, a sense of public responsibility and a spirit of self reliance.

 

1.3       OBJECTIVES

Accordingly, the main objectives are:

  • to instill in students a sound knowledge of Geography, an appreciation of its applications in different socio-cultural contexts and to involve the students in an intellectually stimulating and satisfying experience of learning and studying the workings of society.

 

  • to properly equip the students with sufficient and relevant academic and technical knowledge and skills for tackling problems of spatial planning and development of our entire environment respectively.

 

  • to provide students with broad and well balanced knowledge of geographical theories and methods.

 

  • to cultivate in students the ability to organize and formulate the principles according to acquired geographic and meteorological concepts, which they can apply to observe, analyze and interpret spatial and ecological problems in their immediate and wider environment.

 

  • to develop in students a range of useful competencies in public, private and self-employment. The successful graduates are equipped for private and public sector job opportunities as highlighted in the box below:

 

PRIVATE SECTION

PUBLIC SECTOR

(a)  Self-Employed

(b)  Consultancy Jobs (e.g. United Nations,   

      World Bank etc)

(c)  Oil Companies (e.g. Mobil, ELF, Shell etc)

(d)  Banks (e.g. UBA, First Bank etc)

(e)  Environmental Management Firms

     (e.g.  EIA services, Waste  Management)

(f)  Transport Corporation (e.g. Land, sea

(g)  Housing Estate Developers

(h)  Lecturers in Private Universities,

     Colleges and Polytechnics

(i)   Business/Trade/Manufacturing Firms

(j)   Oil and Gas Servicing Firms

(k)  Political Parties Secretariat   Administrators

(l)   Agricultural Services and Supplies

(m) Information and Communication

     Technology Companies

(n)  Construction and Engineering

     Company Administrators

(a)  Lecturers in Federal and State University, Colleges of

      Education, Polytechnics & Research Institutes.

(b)  Oil and Gas Energy Parastatals e.g. NNPC, Power

      Holdings etc

(c)  Water Basin Development Authority (e.g. Anambra – Imo

      River Basin Authority)

(d)  Federal & State Ministries as Administrators

(e)  Local Government Administrators

(f)   International Organizations

(g)  Rural Development Programme (Boards)

(h)  Urban Development Authorities

(i)   National Population Commission

(j)   National Commissions (e.g. INEC, Energy, etc)

(k)  Town Planning Authorities

(l)   Water Boards

(m) Environmental Management Boards (e.g. Waste

     Disposal, Pollution Control etc)

(n) Tourism & Sports Boards

(o) Information & Communication Technology (ICT) Companies

(p) International Non-governmental Organizations

(q) Military & Defense Organizations

(r)  National Space & Meteorological Agencies

(s)  Federal & State Infrastructure Development Boards

 

1.4       MISSION STATEMENT

            The Department of Geography and Meteorology is totally committed to the:

  • training and development of well-informed, self-reliant and discipline graduates that are competent in observing, analyzing, synthesizing and conceptualizing all aspects of the physical, social and economic environments.

 

1.5       DEGREE IN VIEW

The nomenclature of the degree to be awarded is B.Sc. (Hons.) Geography and Meteorology.

 

2.         ACADEMIC PROGRAMME

2.1       BASIC ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

There are three forms of entry requirements:

  1. University Matriculation Examination (UME) candidates seeking admission into the Department through the University Matriculation Examination (UME) organized by the Joint Admission and Matriculation Board (JAMB) must in addition to passing the entrance examination at the University specified level, posses the Senior Secondary School Certificate (SSSC) or General Certificate of Education (GCE) or their equivalent, with ordinary level, (O’level) credits in at least five subjects.  The core subject includes English and Geography, and any other three subjects chosen from the following: Building, Physics, Mathematics, Chemistry, Biology, Government, Economics, Agricultural Science and Fine Art, obtained in not more than two sittings. 

 

            Candidates who passed the necessary qualifying examination organized by the University Pre-Science Unit at the end of one academic session of the Pre-Science Programme could be admitted to first year, provided they posses the relevant credit requirements at ordinary level.

 

ii.         Direct Entry (DE)

            Holders of at least two Advanced level (A’Level) passes in Geography and any one from Physics, Chemistry, Government, Economics, Agricultural Science and Biology, including the relevant credit requirements at Ordinary level are eligible for admission.  If Mathematics is not one of the A’level passes, an O’level credit in it is acceptable.  In addition, WMO Class II Meteorologist certificate entitles one for direct entry, provided Departmental requirements are met.  Holders of National Certificate of Education (NCE) with at least credit/merit in Geography, including at least five O’level credits in the relevant subjects are acceptable for admission.

 

iii.        Holders of Ordinary National Diploma (OND) with minimum of upper credit in Geography, Meteorology, Environmental Studies or any related field relevant to Geography and Meteorology will be considered for direct entry admission provided they satisfy in addition, the basic O’level entry requirements of the University with credit level passes in five relevant subjects, as stated in 2.1(i), in not more than two sittings.

 

2.2       MINIMUM GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

To qualify for the award of the degree of Bachelor of Science in Geography and Meteorology a student:

  • must have spent a minimum of 3 or 4 years on the programme depending on the year of entry for Regular while a minimum of 5 or 6 years is for CEP.

 

  • must have passed all the University compulsory courses.

 

  • must have passed all Departmental and Faculty core courses and required electives.

 

  • should not have spent more than two years in excess of the prescribed minimum periods for the award of the degree.

 

  • should not have less than CGPA of 1.0 at the end of the Programme.

 

  • must have successfully completed a semester of Industrial Work Experience (SIWES) in a recognized and approved organization; a report of which must be submitted, in a bound typewritten form at the end of the exercise.
  • must have passed AfriHub/NAU UMITT examination.

 

  • must have passed ENT 200 (Entrepreneurial Education and Venture Creation) a university wide course examination.

 

2.3       COURSE REQUIREMENT  (REGULAR)

In order to achieve the objective stated above, the programme needs to emphasize core areas. This will ensure the acquisition of desired competence on completion of the programme.  The course requirements are of different categories, namely core or compulsory, elective or optional courses.  A core course must be taken and passed by all students before they can be awarded a degree.  Elective courses consist of a wide range of courses from which students must select a given number, which they must pass before they can be awarded a degree.  Students of the department would be required to take and pass ten credit hours of General Studies in the first year, made up of six credits in the first semester and four in the second semester.  The first year students would be required to take 24 credit hours of inter-faculty courses, 4 credit hours of intra-faculty courses and 10 credit hours of departmental courses.  The total credit hours required for a first year student is a maximum of 48 credit hours.

 

In the second year of study the student is required to take 44 credit hours on the whole, with 22 credit hours for each semester.  The 44 credit hours comprise, four credit hours of inter-faculty courses, four credit hours of intra-faculty courses, 36 credit hours of departmental courses, Direct entry students are required to take one GSS course in each semester, to make up 48 credit hours.

 

In the third year of study, the students are required to take 28 credit hours on the whole, 22 credit hours in the first semester and 6 credit hours in the second semester.  In the second semester of the third year the students are required to undertake six months Students Industrial Work Experience (SIWES) programme. The SIWES is allocated 6 credits hours.  Students with carryover course of 12 credit hours or more are not qualified to participate in the SIWES.  In the first semester, the students are required to take two credit hours of Inter-faculty courses, 16 credit hours of compulsory departmental courses and four credit hours of elective courses to make it a total of 22 credit hours.

 

In the fourth year of study, the students are required to take 42 credit hours on the whole.  Students should take 20 credit hours in the first semester, which comprise 16 credit hours of compulsory departmental courses and four credit hours of electives.  In the second semester of the fourth year, the students are required to take 22 credit hours, which comprise two credit hours of inter-faculty course, ten credit hours of compulsory departmental courses; four credit hours of electives and six credit hours are allocated to their original research project.  The programme structure is summarized in Table I.

2.3b    COURSE REQUIREMENT  (CEP)

In order to achieve the objective stated above, the programme needs to emphasize core areas. This will ensure the acquisition of desired competence on completion of the programme.  The course requirements are of different categories, namely core or compulsory, elective or optional courses.  A core course must be taken and passed by all students before they can be awarded a degree.  Elective courses consist of a wide range of courses from which students must select a given number, which they must pass before they can be awarded a degree.  Students of the department would be required to take and pass ten (10) credit hours of General Studies in the first year, made up of six (6) credits in the first semester and four in the second semester.  The first year students would be required to take 20 credit hours of inter-faculty courses.  The total credit hours required for a first year student is a maximum of 30 credit hours.

 

In the second year of study the student is required to take 30 credit hours on the whole, with 12 and 14 credit hours for 1st and 2nd semester respectively.  The 30 credit hours comprise, ten (10) credit hours of inter-faculty courses, eight (8) credit hours of intra-faculty courses, 12 credit hours of departmental courses. Direct entry students are required to take one GSS course in each semester, to make up 34 credit hours.

 

In the third year of study, the students are required to take 32 credit hours on the whole, 14 credit hours in the first semester and 18 credit hours in the second semester. 

 

In the first semester of the fourth year, the students are required to take two credit hours of Intra-faculty courses, 14 credit hours of compulsory departmental courses to make it a total of 16 credit hours.  In the second semester of the fourth year the students are required to undertake six months Students Industrial Work Experience (SIWES) programme. The SIWES is allocated 6 credits hours.  Students with carryover course of 12 credit hours or more are not qualified to participate in the SIWES.

 

In the fifth year of study, the students are required to take 26 credit hours on the whole.  Students should take 14 credit hours in the first semester, which comprise 10 credit hours of compulsory departmental courses and four credit hours of electives.  In the second semester of the fifth year, the students are required to take 12 credit hours, which comprise two credit hours of intra-faculty course and ten credit hours of compulsory departmental courses.

 

In the sixth year, the students are required to take 22 credit hours on the whole.  Students should take 12 credit hours in the first semester, which comprise 8 credit hours of compulsory departmental courses and 4 credit hours of electives.  In the second semester of the sixth year, the students are required to take 10 credit hours, four credit hours of electives and six credit hours are allocated to their original research project.   The programme structure is summarized in Table I.

 

Table 1:  Regular Programme Structure

 

Category of Courses

Credit hours

100 Level

200 Level

300 Level

400 Level

Total

 

1st

2nd

1st

2nd

1st

2nd

1st

2nd

 

General Studies (GSS)

6

4

-*

-*

-*

SIWES

-*

-*

10

Inter-faculty courses

12

12

2

2

2

-

2

32

Intra-faculty courses

2

2

2

2

-

-

-

8

Departmental courses

4

6

18

18

16

16

16

100

Electives

-

-

-

-

4

4

4

12

 

24

24

22

22

22

6

20

22

 

Total

48

44

28

42

162

 

*   Direct entry students are required to take  GSS courses

A student is required to take a total of 162 credit hours before graduation.

 

Table 2:  Continuing Education Programme Structure (CEP)

 

Category of Courses 

Credit Hours

100 Level 

200 Level

300 Level

400 Level 

500 Level 

600 Level 

Total

1st

2nd

1st

2nd

1st

2nd

1st

2nd

1st

2nd

1st

2nd

General Studies (GSS)

6

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10

Inter-faculty courses

12

8

4

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

30

Intra-faculty courses

-

-

4

4

-

-

2

-

-

2

-

-

12

Departmental courses

-

-

6

6

14

18

14

6

10

10

8

6

98

Electives

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

4

4

12

Total

18

12

14

16

14

18

16

6

14

12

12

10

 

Each Semester

Total

30

30

32

22

26

22

162

 

*   Direct entry students are required to take GSS courses

A student is required to take a total of 162 credit hours before graduation.

 

2.4       TRANSFER

Transfer from other Universities or Intra-University transfers would be treated on their individual merits and subject to the University guidelines on transfer cases.

 

2.5       DURATION OF PROGRAMME

The Bachelor of Science Programme in Geography and Meteorology shall last for a minimum period of 8 semesters, that is four academic sessions for UME entrants and three academic sessions for direct entry students.  However, any student who fails to graduate within the minimum duration is granted an extension of two extra academic sessions.  This extension period is not automatic, it is granted through a written permission from the University Senate.  If a student fails to graduate within this stipulated period, such a student must leave the University without a degree.

 

2.6       EXCESS CREDIT HOURS

All students in the Department offering this programme, shall take a minimum of 20 credit hours and a maximum of 24 credit hours per semester.  If a student has excess credit hours to take, it is only on special Senate dispensation that such a student is permitted to take extra credit hours.

 

2.7       SUB-DIVISION OF COURSES

Courses in the Department are taught through tutorials and practical, as well as through formal lectures.  Practical are taught mainly outdoor at the synoptic weather station and during Field Course.  Field Courses last for 3 or 5 days depending on the level of the Courses.

2.8       COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM AND CORE AREAS

2.8.1   Course Numbering System

Each course in the programme is designated by three letters followed by three digit numbers.  The course code for Geography and Meteorology is “GME”.  The three-digit numbers follow the course code.  The first digit indicates the level of year of study at which the course is offered.  The second digit indicates the core area and the third digit indicates the order of the course in sequence of the courses in the same core area.

 

2.8.2   Core Areas

            The core areas of study in the programme and their code numbers are given below:

 

Core Area                                                                                              Code Numbers

  • Practical, Field Course, Industrial Training, Synoptic Meteorology and Weather

Forecasting

0

  • Physical Geography and Meteorology

1

  • Human Geography and Bio-Meteorology

2

  • Quantitative Methods in Geography and Meteorology

3

  • Resource Management, Climatology, Applied Meteorology and Climatology

4

  • Philosophy and Methodology of Geography, Historical Development in Meteorology

5

  • Research Method in Geography and Meteorology

6

  • Regional Analysis, Urban and Regional Planning

7

  • Dynamic Meteorology

8

  • Original Research Project

9

 

3.         EXAMINATION, PERFORMANCE EVALUATION CRITERIA AND MODERATION OF EXAMINATION

 

3.1       EXAMINATION

Examinations are conducted to evaluate students’ performance at the end of each semester.  To be eligible for any end of course examination, students must duly be registered for the course.  Any course registered must be taken and passed.  All compulsory courses at any given level must be registered and taken in the end of semester examination.  It is only in serious medical cases that a student may be exempted from an examination and this should be reported to the Head of Department with a medical report from the Doctor, within 24 hours from the time of admission in the hospital.  If a student fails to comply with this regulation, such a student should carry the course over to the next academic session and re-register it.  All failed courses should be registered firsts, before any new course.  Registration of first and second semester courses should be done at the beginning of each new session.

 

To qualify to be part of the end of course examination, a student must have attended at least 75% of the lectures and practicals.

 

3.2       PERFORMANCE EVALUATION CRITERIA

            Students’ performance shall be assessed through:

  • Written examination
  • Continuous assessments

 

The time allowed for written examination shall not normally exceed three hours and not less than one hour.  All 100 level courses should be either multiple choice questions or short fill-in-gap questions.  A minimum of 50 and a maximum of 100 such questions should be set for a course.

 

Continuous assessment is based on intra-semester examination or quizzes, term papers, compulsory practical and/or assignments.  All grades in continuous assessment shall range from 20% to 40% of the students’ overall performance in the course in a semester, while written examination shall be graded from 60% to 80% as the case may be.  Practical oriented courses shall be graded accordingly.  All examination papers (theory and practical) shall be graded with a minimum pass mark of 40%, except otherwise directed by the Faculty or Departmental Boards.

 

Students’ performance during the semester shall be graded on a 5 point grading system.  This is shown on table 2.

 

Table 3:  Grading System

Percentage Score

Grade

Grade Point (GP)

Remark

70 – 100%

60 – 69%

50 – 59%

45 – 49%

40 – 44%

0 – 39%

A

B

C

D

E

F

5

4

3

2

1

0

Excellent

Very good

Average

Below Average

Pass

Failure

 

The final degree a student obtains will be classified using the final cumulative grade point average (FCGPA) as shown in table 3.

 

Table 4:  Final Cumulative Grade Point Average

Cumulative Grade  Point Average (CGPA)

Final Cumulative Grade Point Average

Class of Degree

Derived By

4.50 – 5.00

First Class Honours

Multiplying Credit

3.50 – 4.49

Second Class (Upper)

Units and Grade

2.40 – 3.49

Second Class (Lower)

Point and Dividing by Total

1.50 – 2.39

Third Class

Credit Units

1.00 – 1.49

Pass

 

3.3       MODERATION OF EXAMINATION

All question papers for the 100, 200, 300 and 400 levels shall be moderated internally by selected members of Departmental Examinations’ Board (DEB). The final semester examination (degree examination shall be moderated by the DEB and the EXTERNAL Examiner).  The External Examiner shall assess the qualify of the students’ performance as well as the overall standard of the course offered in the Department.  The External Examiner shall participate in the determination of overall results and in the classification of degrees.

4.         TABLE 5: LIST OF TEACHING STAFF

           

Name

Status & Qualifications

Research Interest

Prof. L.N. Muoghalu

FIMEA, FICA, MNEB, MSIRM, MNGA, MNES.

Professor

B.A. (Lagos), M.Ed. (Suny/B), M.Sc., Ph.D. (Benin).

Urban and Regional Planning, Urban & Rural Housing, Political Geography, Environmental Economics, Environmental Impact Assessment, Environmental Psychology, Environmental Policy Analysis and Decision Making, Urban Transportation.

Prof. M.A. Ijioma

NGA, NEA, NEST, NIPRANET

Professor

B.A. (Lagos), M.A. (Lagos), Ph.D (Lagos).

Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies, Climate Change and Disaster Management

Dr. E.A. Obienusi

MNGA,  MAGA, MNEB, MIRDI.

Senior Lecturer & Acting Head

B.Sc. Hons (Nigeria), M.Sc.,

Ph.D. (Ilorin).

Regional Economic Development, Economic and Industrial Geography, Environmental Economics, Environmental Perception, Population Geography, Environmental Pollution Management, Environmental Resources Management, Urban Geography, Transportation & Environment, Environmental Impact Assessment.

Dr. I.C. Enete

NIMET, EMAN, EBAN, ANG.

Senior Lecturer

B.Sc. (UNN), M.Tech (Minna). Ph.D. (ESUT).

Urban Heat Island Studies; Environmental Management; Climate Change.

Dr. E.E. Ezenwaji

ANG, NIPR, NIMN, EBAN, JP

 

Urban Water Resources with special emphasis and Urban Water Supply, Environmental Management.

Barr. (Mrs) N.G. Ezeabasili

MNBA, MNES, MEHSON

Lecturer I

B.A, Ed. (Hons), (UNN), LL.B, (NAU), B.L, LL.M (NAU).

Environmental Law, Arbitration Law, Women & Minority Rights, Human Rights

Mr. B.O. Osuiwu

Lecturer I

B.Sc., M.Sc. (Nigeria).

Climate Change and Sustainable Development;  Air Pollution Hazards (Concentration/Dispersion); Ozone Layer Depletion; Greenhouse Effect; Global Warming etc.

Mr.  H.O.  Ahiadu

MNES, MEHSON, MGEOSON

Lecturer  I

B.Sc. (LASU), M.Sc. (Ibadan).

GIS and Satellite Remote Sensing Applications, Environmental Impact Assessment, Environmental Resources Management, Poverty and Environmental Studies, Agriculture and Environment, Rural Development Issues, Climate Change Issues, Population, Environment and Development Issues, Environment & Urbanization, Waste and Pollution Issues.

Mr.  Igu  Nwabueze  I.

MEBAN

Lecturer II

B.Sc. (Nig.)

M.Sc. (Ibadan).

 

Medical Geography Issues – Disease Studies and Medical Inventions over Space, – Disease Mapping using GIS Techniques,  Land Resource Evaluation, Tourism and Conservation Planning, Environmental Management – Loss of Biodiversity,  Pollution Control.

 

NON-ACADEMIC STAFF

Name

Status & Qualifications

P.O. Okafor

 

Chief Technologist

B.Sc. (NAU), Adv. Cert (Cartography), Dip. In Computer Literacy. MBA.

H.C.  Udenka

Executive Officer

B.Sc. (NAU).

J.O. Obiegbu

 

Asst. Executive Officer

O.N.D. (Business Administration).

R. N.U. Okeke

Computer Operator

WAEC., Diploma in Computer Literacy.

 

DEPARTMENTAL STAFF PHOTO ALBUM

 

 

 




























 



 


 




 


 

 




 


 



 



 
 
 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 .         DESCRIPTION OF THE SEMESTER AND SESSION’S WORKLOAD

The constituents of the semester and session’s workload are described in the schedules that are given below:

 

100 LEVEL (FIRST SEMESTER) 

 

Course Code

Course  Title

Pre-

requisite

L

T

P

TU

University Wide Courses

GSS 101

Use of English

-

2

0

0

2

GSS 105

Humanities

-

2

0

0

2

GSS 107

Nigerian People and Culture

-

2

0

0

2

Inter- Faculty  Courses

PHY 101

General Physics I

-

2

0

3

3

ICH 101

Basic Organic Chemistry I

-

2

0

0

2

BIO 101

General Biology I

-

2

0

3

3

MAT 101

Mathematic I

-

2

0

0

2

BUS 101

Introduction to Business Management I 

-

2

0

0

2

Intra-Faculty Courses

ESM 101

Principles of Economics I

-

2

0

0

2

EVM III

Nature of Environmental Science I

-

2

0

0

2

Departmental Courses

GME 101

Introduction to Practical Geography.

-

1

0

3

2

 

Total

 

21

0

9

24










 

100 LEVEL (SECOND SEMESTER) 

 

Course Code

Course Title

Pre-

Requisite

L

T

P

TU

University Wide Courses

GSS 102

Use of English II

GSS 101

2

0

0

2

GSS 103

Introduction to Logic & Philosophy

-

2

0

0

2

Inter-Faculty Courses

PHY 102

General Physics II

PHY 101

2

0

3

3

ICH 102

Basic Physical Chemistry II

ICH 101

2

0

0

2

BIO 102

General Biology

BIO 101

2

0

3

3

MAT 102

Mathematics II

MAT 101

2

0

0

2

BUS 102

Introduction to Business Management  II

-

2

0

0

2

Intra-Faculty Courses

ESM 102

Principles of Economics II

ESM 101

2

0

0

2

Departmental Courses

GME 102

Local Field Studies

GME 101

0

0

6

2

GME 112

Introduction to Physical Geography & Meteorology.

-

2

0

0

2

GME 122

Introduction to Human Geography

-

2

0

0

2

 

Total

 

18

0

18

24

L - Lectures, T - Tutorials, P – Practical.

 

YEAR  II ( 200 LEVEL)  FIRST SEMESTER

Course Code

Course Title

Pre-requisite

L

T

P

TU

Inter-Faculty Courses

CSC101

Computer Language and Programming I

 

2

0

0

2

SVI 181

Basic  Surveying

 

2

0

0

2

Departmental Courses

GME 203

Practical  Meteorology &  Instrumentation  I

 

2

0

0

2

GME 205

Introduction  to Cartography

 

2

0

0

2

GME 211

Introduction to Geomorphology

 

2

0

0

2

GME 213

Introduction to Hydrology

 

2

0

0

2

GME 215

Introduction to Biogeography

 

2

0

0

2

GME 217

Introduction to Urban &  Regional  Planning I

 

2

0

0

2

GME 221

Spatial Organization of Society

 

2

0

0

2

GME 231

Introduction to Statistics for  Geographers and Meteorologist 

 

2

0

0

2

GME 271

Tropical  Meteorology

 

2

0

0

2

 

Total

 

22

0

0

 22

  • L - Lectures, T - Tutorials, P – Practical.

YEAR II ( 200 LEVEL)   SECOND SEMESTER

 

Course Code

Course Title

Pre-requisite

L

T

P

TU

Inter-Faculty Courses

CSC102

Computer Language & Programming II

CSC 101

2

0

0

2

Intra-Faculty Courses

SVI 182

Basic Surveying II

SVI 181

1

0

3

2

Departmental Courses

GME 204

Practical Meteorology & Instrumentation  II

GME 203

0

0

2

2

GME 206

Field Course I

GME 102

0

0

6

2

GME 212

Introduction to Water Resources

GME 112

2

0

0

2

GME 216

Biogeography

GME 215

2

0

0

2

GME 218

Introduction to Urban & Regional Planning II

GME 217

2

0

0

2

GME 222

Introduction to Population Geography

 

2

0

0

2

GME 232

Quantitative Techniques in Geography and Environmental Planning I

GME 231

2

0

0

2

GME 244

Ecology of Natural Resources

 

2

0

0

2

GME 242

Principles of Climatology

 

2

0

0

2

 

Total

 

17

0

11

22

  • L - Lectures, T - Tutorials, P – Practical.

Course Code

Course Title

Pre-requisite

L

T

P

TU

Intra-Faculty Courses

LAW 417

Land Law I

-

2

0

2

2

Departmental Courses

GME 307

Field Course II

GME 206

2

0

6

2

GME 381

Synoptic Meteorology

-

2

0

3

2

GME 317 

Geomorphology of the Humid  Tropics 

-

2

0

0

2

GME 323

Economic Geography

-

2

0

0

2

GME 325

Population Geography

GME 222

2

0

0

2

GME 387

Water Resources of Tropical Africa

GME 212

2

0

0

2

GME 361

Research Methodology in Geography Meteorology / Environmental Management. 

-

2

0

0

2

GME 371

Geography of African Development 

-

2

0

0

2

Optional Department Courses (Electives) Choose only two courses from the either Group A or Group B

 

GROUP A

GME 319

Hydrology

GME 213

2

0

0

2

GME 327

Settlement Geography 

 

2

0

0

2

GME 341

Principles  of Land Evaluation

 

2

0

0

2

GROUP B

GME 385

Thermodynamics of the Atmospheric

 

2

0

0

2

GME 383

Cloud Physics

 

2

0

0

2

GME 343

Principles of Oceanography

 

2

0

0

2

 

Total

 

19

0

9

22

THIRD YEAR  (300 LEVEL) FIRST SEMESTER

 

 

L - Lectures, T - Tutorials, P – Practical.

 

               N.B:  Students specializing  in Geography are advised  to choose two  courses form Group A while  those  specializing  in

        Meteorology  should  choose  two courses from Group B . Note  that if  you do  not comply with this  instruction  you 

       run  the  risk of having  your  courses  cancelled. 

 

THIRD YEAR (300 LEVEL) SECOND SEMESTER

Course  Code

Course  Title

Pre-

requisite

L

T

P

TU

GME 309

SIWES (Students proceed  on one Semester Industrial  Work for Practical  Experience)

-

6

0

O

6

 

 

 

 

FOURTH YEAR  (400 LEVEL): FIRST SEMESTER

 

Course Code

Course Title

Pre-requisite

L

T

P

TU

Compulsory Departmental Courses

GME 409

Advanced Cartographic Methods

GME 205

1

0

3

2

GME 401

Environmental Impact Assessment

 

2

0

0

2

GME 433

Quantitative Techniques in Geography and  Environmental Planning II

GME 232

2

0

0

2

GME 451

History of  Geographic Thought

-

2

0

0

2

GME 461

Geographic Information Systems I

 

2

0

0

2

GME 473

The Developed World

-

2

0

0

2

GME 481

Micro Meteorology 

-

2

0

0

2

GME 425

Environmental Resources Management

-

2

0

0

2

Optional Departmental Courses (electives)  Choose  only two courses from the groups  of optional specifications. Specifically choose one elective course from Group A and  one  from Group B)

 

Group A:  Physical Geography/Meteorological Option

GME 445

Agro Meteorology

-

2

0

0

2

GME 427

Applied Meteorology

-

2

0

0

2

GME 429

Moonson Meteorology

-

2

0

0

2

GME 447

Climatological Pressure System

-

2

0

0

2

GME 431

Numerical  Weather Prediction

-

1

0

3

2

GROUP B:  Natural Resources and Environmental  Management Option

GME 449

Agricultural  Geography

 

2

0

0

2

GME 423

Water  Resources  Planning and Management

GME 387

2

0

0

2

GME 439

Forestry Economics & Wildlife Policy,

 Law &  Administration

2

0

0

2

GME 435

Urban Environmental  Problems

 

2

0

0

2

GME 437

Tourism and Recreational Management

 

2

0

0

2

 

Total

 

21

0

3

20









 

400 LEVEL  SECOND SEMESTER

Course Code

Course Title

Pre-requisite

L

T

P

TU

Inter-Faculty Courses

LAW  418

Land Law II

Law 417

2

0

0

2

Compulsory Departmental Courses

GME 452

Contemporary Philosophy and Methodology  in Geography 

GME 451

2

0

0

2

GME 474

The Developing  World

 

2

0

0

2

GME 472

Systematic Geography of Nigerian Development

 

2

0

0

2

GME 476 

Operational Meteorology 

 

2

0

0

2

GME 462

Geographic Information Systems II  

GME 461

2

0

0

2

GME 491

Original Research Project 

 

2

0

18

6

Optional Courses (electives choose only two courses from the groups of options specifications. Specifically, choose one  elective course from group  C and one from  group D).

GROUP C:   Physical Geography

GME 456A

Climatic Geomorphology

 

2

0

0

2

GME 456B

Applied Geomorphology

 

2

0

0

2

GME 438

Special Topics in Meteorology

 

2

0

0

2

GME 456C

Fluvial Geomorphology

 

2

0

0

2

GME 454

Arid and Semi Arid Hydrology

 

2

0

0

2

GROUP D:  Human Resources and Urban Regional Planning

GME 482

Urban Geography

 

2

0

0

2

GME 486

Regional Planning Models

 

2

0

0

2

GME 418

Principles of Town and Country Planning

 

2

0

0

2

GME 488

Rural Geography, Development and Planning

 

2

0

0

2

GME 478

Medical Geography

 

2

0

0

2

GME 466

Industrial Geography

 

2

0

0

2

GME 432

Demography

GME 325

2

0

0

2

GME 428

Political Geography

 

2

0

0

2

GME 464

Transportation and Environment

 

2

0

0

2

GME 442

Environmental Hazards and Disaster Management

 

2

0

0

2

 

Total

 

18

0

18

22









 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.         COURSE DESCRIPTION

GME 101:       Introduction to Practical Geography (2 Credits)

Map Reading:  Location, map scale, conventional signs, representation of relief and recognition of relief forms, analysis and interpretation of relief forms on maps, analysis and interpretation of cultural features on maps. Graphical and map presentation of geographical data, isoline maps, clorepleth maps, dot maps, flow maps etc.

 

GME 102:       Local Field Studies (2 Credits)

Field studies for familiarization of students with their local environments, and for practicalizing classroom lectures in both human and physical geography.

 

EVM 111:        Nature of Environmental Science I (2 Credits)

Basic principles and concepts of the environment; energy systems in the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere; ecosystems, resources and resources management.  Man-environmental relationship; current environmental issues, including air pollution and other natural hazards; erosion, drought, earthquakes, hurricanes, floods etc.

Origins and growth of settlements, factors affecting the siting and development of villages and towns.  Effects of advances in science, technology, medicine and public hygienic on the environment.  Systems of land tenure and land use philosophy of planning new or ideal town.  The control of development and the maintenance and improvement of the environment. Philosophy of sustainable development surveying, photogrammetry and remote sensing as tools for environmental planning and management. Environment and building science.

 

GME 112:       Introduction to Physical Geography and Meteorology (2 Credits)

The composition and structure of the lithosphere, atmosphere and hydrosphere. Nature, distribution, evolution and significance of the first order relief forms of the earth.

Importance of Meteorology, meteorological, parameters, synoptic charts, structure of atmosphere, pressure heights, vertical temperature distribution, radiation and isolation. The earth’s radiation, atmospheric and oceanic circulation systems introduction to the cycling of matter and energy in ecosystems.

 

GME 122:       Introduction to Human Geography (2 Credits)

Man, Location and Resources:  The scope of human geography and its relation to physical geography.

World Population:  Its distribution and patterns of growth demographic characteristics of selected populations.

Human Settlements:  Evolution, patterns and functions. Inter-relationships between urban and rural settlements.

Environmental Resources; the Concept of Resources:  Types of resources and their global distribution, relationship between resources and tertiary activities, impact of human activities on the environment at varying level of technology and population densities.  The role of movement; flows of people, goods, energy and ideas.

 

SVI 181:          Basic Surveying (2 Credit)

Theodolite:  Traversing: definition and type of traversing the procedures and method of theodolite traversing.  Temporary and permanent adjustment theodolite for traversing.  Collection of field data, computations and traverse adjustment.  Production of plan at suitable scale. Sources of errors and accuracy attainable.

Leveling: Definition and uses of leveling, principles and methods of leveling. Leveling with inverted staff and reciprocal leveling.  Data collection, computation and leveling adjustment. Sources of errors. Correction and accuracy attainable.

Tacheometry:  Special feature and uses of tacheometer. Detailing, controls and determination of spot-levels using techeometry.  Substance  bar and its uses. Contouring, preparation of large scale plan.

 

SVI 182:          Introductory Surveying (2 Credit)

Theodolite and compass surveying: Introduction, declination, basic definitions, fundamental operations, compass theodolite transverse, errors, local attraction and magnetic declination problem, optical and electronic theodolites etc.  Ordinary leveling: introduction and basic definitions, errors in leveling, leveling staff, different methods of leveling.  Curvature and refraction. Tacheometry: introduction and principles, tacheometric calculations and reductions, errors and uses of tacheometric surveying.  Plotting of contours, interpolation of contours, characteristics of contours and uses of contours; advantages and disadvantages of planer table survey; preparation of survey plans.

 

GME 203:       Practical Meteorology and Instrumentation (2 Credits)

Meteorological observation units, accuracy required, sources of errors, exposure of instruments, general rules and procedure for the observation and recording of meteorological variables: pressure, air, temperature, atmospheric humidity, visibility and cloud cover, sunshine and radiation, precipitation, evaporation, vapour pressure, present and past weather, principles of radiation instruments, radiation sensors and sources. Solar radiation: direct and diffuse components, ultra violet radiation from polarization of light in the atmosphere, measurement of terrestrial radiation, measurement of evaporation.

 

GME 204:       Practical Meteorology and Instrumentation II (2 Credits)

Synoptic Weather Analysis:  The concept of synoptic analysis. Preparation of synoptic charts, weather symbols and codes. Synoptic representation of the pressure field. Isobars on level surface and contours of constant pressure surface. Frontal zones, cold fronts, warm fronts and occluded fronts. Frontal analysis and interpretations.

 

GME 205:       Introduction to Cartography (2 Credits)

History of map making: Techniques of  map making. Cartographic processes. Types of maps, design and construction of physical and economic maps. Basic contour compilation, profiles, flow maps, pie graphs and bar graphs. Map projection and lettering techniques.

 

GME 206:       Field Course I (2 Credits)

4-5 days study and analysis of geographic problems in the field operated in a spiral manner from the environment of the University to the Local Government Area and ultimately to the entire state.  Emphasis is on mastering field techniques for solving simple geographic problems through applying theoretical classroom work to real life problems.  Field data collection and simple analysis are emphasized. The course is fieldwork oriented, focuses on the physical dimensions and human activities of the area, including management of resources, hazards, etc and their relationships.

 

GME 211:       Introduction To Geomorphology (2 Credits)

The meaning and scope of Geomorphology. Rock types, their origins and characteristics, geomorphic processes. Weathering types and processes. Nature and origin of second order relief forms of the continents, volcanism and diastrophism. Structural landforms. Glacial landforms. Development of drainage patterns and fluvial landforms. Coastal processes of landform development in deserts, Karst landforms.

 

GME 212:       Introduction to Water Resources (2 Credits)

The meaning and scope of water resources, water resources as different from hydrology, water resources exploitation uses and conservation, sources and facilities for urban and rural water supply, approaches to urban and rural water supply, water supply and sanitation governance in the tropics.

 

GME 213:       Introduction to Hydrology (2 Credits)

The nature of the science of hydrology. Definition, scope and applications. The concept of hydrological cycle and water balance, historical development and systems approach in hydrology.

Precipitation:  importance, characteristics and measuring devices. Watershed as a unit for hydrological studies, delimitation and morphology.

Water losses:  Interception, evaporation, evapotranspiration infiltration, surface runoff, relationships between precipitation, surface runoff and groundwater flow, erosion and sedimentation.

 

GME 215:       Introduction to Biogeography (2 Credits)

The meaning and scope of Biogeography. Basic structure and dynamics of plant communities; factors influencing plant growth. Survey of characteristics, distribution and controlling factors of principal or zonal vegetation types. Ecology and ecosystems, biomes. Man’s influence on vegetation. The meaning and scope of soil geography; factors of soil formation; zonal soils, Azonal soils and intrazonal soils.

 

GME 216:       Biogeography (2 Credits)

Evaluation of biogeographical perspectives. Tropical biological environment; the biosphere in the tropic, the concept of the ecosystem structure and functioning of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems; primary biological productivity in the tropics. Floristic and faunal differentiation in the tropics; the tropical rainforest and its anthropic derivatives, tropical savanna vegetation, the dynamic status of savanna vegetation, the forest/savanna competition and boundary, vegetation changes through time, adaptation, succession and climax vegetation.

GME 217:       Introduction to Urban and Regional Planning I (2 Credits)

The history of town planning and evolution of town planning; the bases of urban and regional planning; definition of relevant terms; rural areas, urban areas, region, hamlet, village, town, city, metropolise, megacity, megalopolise, municipality; planning and management: categories of planning and levels of planning, management: definition, schools of thought, functions of management, relationship between planning and management; history of town planning, evolution of town planning in Nigeria. The role of urban and regional planners to the society.

 

GME 218:       Introduction to Urban and Regional Planning II (2 Credits)

Elements of Planning:  Planning process, theories and models of urban and regional planning. Rural and urban land use theories; information requirements, survey methods and technique of analysis in urban and regional planning; the development plan system; urban renewal and techniques. Transportation planning methods. Housing and basic components of human settlements.

 

GME 221:       Spatial Organization of Society (2 Credit)

Some basic concepts of spatial organization, principles of classification of geographical phenomena, growth and spatial distribution of population, basic concepts of environmental psychology. Production systems, typology and distribution; location, spacing and growth of settlement, movements over space and transport networks. Land use:  typology, patterns and interactions.

 

GME 222:       Introduction To Population Geography (2 Credits)

Examination of population data sources. Population growth and components. Migration processes and consequences. The Nigerian population structure, distribution patterns and their implications.

 

GME 231:       Introduction to Statistics for Geographers and Meteorologist (2 Credits)

The place of statistics in research. Review of algebraic operations. Subscripts and summations. Data description and characteristics. Frequency distributions and graphic presentation. Measures of central tendency and variability; methods of sampling; sources of spatial data. Nature of raw data, calculation and use of deviation and variability.  Probability theory and methods of sampling. Hypothesis and their testing. Tests of significance.

 

GME 232:       Quantitative Techniques in Geography and Environmental Planning II

(2 Credits)

Binomial Distribution:  Student’s t-test.  Description of point patterns, nearest neigbour analysis.

Correlation Analysis:  Simple correlation, partial correlation and multiple correlation.

Regression Analysis:  Simple and multiple regression, chi-square analysis. Centrographic techniques. Analysis of variance (ANOVA).

 

GME 242:       Principles of Climatology (2 Credits)

Climatology: Definition of climate, branches of climatology. The general circulation of the atmosphere: scales and laws of motion. Forces that drive the atmosphere. Major features and models of the circulation, weather-producing systems – air masses and fronts, frontal and non-frontal depressions, tropical systems. Climate classification and global systems of climate.  Urban climatology: classification-macro, meso and micro climatology. Definition, scope and example of micro, meso and topoclimatology, meso-climatology, lakes, seas, deserts, land and sea breeze, valley winds. Types of meso-environment. Energy and water balance processes. Micro-climatology: vertical temperature, humidity and wind profile in the atmospheric boundary layer, influences of ground surface on the micro-climate, heat island effect.  Heat exchanges between ground and ambient air. Factors affecting air and soil temperature. African climate: climate variability and change.

 

GME 244:       Ecology of Natural Resources (2 Credits)

Meaning and scope of Ecology. Population, community, ecosystem, environment and environmental factors. Study of communities and ecosystem abundance, density, yield, cover, frequency. The ecology of niche, niche, overlap competition co-existency, resources shift.

 

Ecosystems as fundamental units of Natural resources; the concept of Natural Resources.

Habitats:  The primary terrestrial and aquatic habitats which affect man. Alteration imposed on the habitats by man. Conservation and management of ecosystems. Conservation planning of natural resources and national and global perspectives.

 

GME 271:       Tropical Meteorology (2 Credits)

Energy characteristics of the tropics, some tropical weather system; land and sea breeze; monsoon; atmospheric disturbances: inter-tropical disturbance lines and line squalls, weather predication in the tropics.

 

GME 307:       Field Course II (2 Credits)

8-10 days intensive field studies designated to illustrate the application of techniques to geographical analysis.

 

GME 309:       Students Industrial Work Experience Scheme (SIWES)

                        One semester of industrial work experience in a recognized establishment.

 

GME 317:       Geomorphology of the Humid Tropics (2 Credits)

Classification and analysis of tropical landforms, weathering in the tropics; deep weathering and mass wasting processes. Significance of deep chemical weathering in Nigeria and associated landforms – the inselberg landscape, geological evolution in Nigeria.  Drainage basin studies, stream adaptation to structure, antecedent and super-imposed drainage basin. Rivers as cascading systems. The cycle of erosion and evolution of tropical landforms-peneplan and pediplan; pediment concept and theories; evolution of slope forms.

 

GME 319:       Hydrology (2 Credits)

The various concepts and principles of hydrology, field and laboratory techniques in hydrology, the planning and organization of hydro meteorological networks, methods of drainage basin instrumentation and observation, purpose and uses of hydrograph analysis and synthesis, techniques of estimating missing hydrological data.

 

GME 323:       Economic Geography (2 Credits)

The Meaning of Economic Geography:  The concepts of basic needs, demand and supply, resources and factors of production, the concepts of comparative advantage, economics of scale, privatization, growth pole and agglomeration economics. The “production systems”.

Theories and Laws:  Landuse theory, central place theory, industrial location theory and spatial interaction models. Economic rent and global trade and movement.

 

 

GME 325:       Population Geography (2 Credits)

Theories and concepts of population, population data as vital statistics, procedure and problems of population data collection including censes. Pattern of population distribution and trends of change. Determinant and spatial aspects of mortality, fertility and migration. Contemporary population issues, population and resources, population pressure and its political implications, population policies, population projection techniques.

 

GME 327:       Settlement Geography (2 Credits)

The role of settlement in the organization of man and his activities, and the spatial manifestation of national development. Evolution of human settlements. Theoretical distribution of settlements. Types and patterns of rural settlement. History of urbanization – classical, medieval, pre-industrial urbanization and form. Modern urbanization, world urbanization pattern. Origin and spatial pattern of urbanization in Nigeria.

 

GME 341:       Principles of Land Evaluation (2 Credits)

Concepts and practices of applied physical geography; purpose and scope of land resources studies.  Principle of land resources evaluation; rural land resources evaluation; rural land resource appraisal; land evaluation for capability and suitability, classification, conservation of rural land resources. Assessing impact on rural land.

 

GME 343:       Principles of Oceanography (2 Credits)

This course presents geological, physical, chemical and biological studies of the earth’s oceans.  Course includes a study of the origin and continuing evolution of the ocean basins, air-sea and land-sea interactions, and life in the oceans.  The law of the sea.

 

GME 361:       Research Methods in Geography Meteorology/Environmental Management

(2 Credits)

Introduction to research methodology. The new paradigm in Geography and the problem of scientific research topic, problem articulation, formulation of hypothesis, theoretical or conceptual framework.  General information systems characteristics – open and closed systems, feedbacks mechanism or system regulation, entropy and negentropy, logic of measurement and association.  Geographic information/ data analysis. Methods of data classification in geography – by subdivision, by grouping and similar observation. Numerical taxonomy, multi-variate classification. Other techniques of data analysis. Explanation and interpretation, report writing, bibliographic arrangement. Geographic information/data storage. Use of maps or computer for data storage.

 

GME 371:       Geography of African Development (2 Credits)

Geography of Africa dealing with the peoples, their culture, history, systems of resources utilization, population patterns and processes and spatial aspects of development.

 

GME 381:       Synoptic Meteorology (2 Credits)

General information on synoptic meteorology. Methods of long and short range weather forecasts.  Basic synoptic codes – prospects of using meteorological satellite data – elements of world weather watch; compilation and analysis of weather charts.  Air masses – their classification and properties; fronts and cyclone activity.  Macro-synoptic processes and long range weather forecast.  Laws of general atmospheric circulation peculiarities of circulation in various areas of the globe.

 

GME 383:       Cloud Physics (2 Credits)

Cloud formation and features, the nuclei of cloud condensation, the growth of cloud droplets, the germination and growth of snow crystal, snow, rain, hail, rain-making experiments. Atmospheric electricity.

 

GME 385:       Thermodynamics of the Atmospheric (2 Credits)

The ideal gas law and the equation of state applied to dry air and water vapour, thermodynamic systems, the hydrostatic equation, thermodynamic variables of the atmosphere and representation on P – V curves, reversible and irreversible processes in the atmosphere. The carnot cycle applied to the atmosphere, first law of thermodynamics and the concept of conservation of energy, adiabatic processes, poisson equation, definition and derivation. The universal gas constant, the concept of illustrating computations based on the topics discussed.

 

GME 387:       Water Resources of Tropical Africa (2 Credits)

Various sources of water supply in tropical Africa, problems of surface and groundwater resources of tropical Africa.  Spatial patterns of residential, industrial, commercial and agricultural water uses in urban and rural areas.  Problems of water resources management in tropical Africa.  Financing water and sanitation in tropical Africa. The role of public and private sector in water supply and management.  African water resources development process and design.  Theoretical models in the study of urban water demand and supply in tropical Africa.

 

GME 401:       Environmental Impact Assessment (2 Credits)

Basic terminology.  Environmental inventory; Environmental Assessment; Environmental Impact Statement; National Environmental Policy Act; E.I.A progress reports; Methods of impact analysis, Public participation in environmental decision-making.  Practical consideration in impact statement writing.  Practical works in E.I.A for few simple selected projects.

 

GME 409:       Advanced Cartographic Methods (2 Credits)

Enlarging and reducing maps, calculation of areas, cartographic, symbolization, theory and method of cartography, application of colour in map design, patterns and sources. Topographic production of type image and lettering, profiling processes; production, planning and costing; basics of photography.  Scope and limitations of the visual presentation of statistics, sources and manipulation of statistics for visual presentation, criteria of significance and choice of technique; scale and error factors. The use of mechanical, optical and photographic aids in cartography.

 

LAW 417:       Land Law I (2 Credits)

Concept of property: meaning and classification, definition of land and classification of rights in land.  Customary land tenure system: nature of title to land under customary law, the concept of family property and alienation of family property.  Customary transactions on land: sale of land at customary law, gift of land, borrowing of land, customary tenancy and customary pledge.  Effects of land use act on customary land tenure system in Nigeria: preservation of customary land tenure system, the Land Use Act and customary right of country and management, customary land relationship and the land use act and revocation of customary right of occupancy and entitlement to compensation.  The doctrine of estate: definition of concept, estate of freehold and co-ownership.  Sale of real property: preliminary considerations and conveyancing procedure.

 LAW 418:       Land Law II  (2 Credits)

Land Use Act: evolution of the Land Use Act, status of the Act under the constitution, Vesting of title in the governor, control and management of land, nature of right of occupancy, customary right of occupancy, certificate of occupancy, alienation of right of occupancy, revocation of right of occupancy and right to compensation.  Planning law:  basis for planning, meaning of development, approval of planning by planning authority, planning permission and enforcement of planning control.  Leases and tenancies: relationship of landlord and tenant, lease and licence, leased/tenancies and the Land Use Act and types of tenancies.

 

GME 418:       Principles of Town and Country Planning  (2 Credits)

Definition of town and country planning, Land use planning process, Stages or principles in land use planning process, models, design, evaluation etc. Land use activities including: population, employment housing shopping, leisure, transport, perception, commercial etc.

 

GME 423:       Water Resources Planning and Management (2 Credits)

Importance and necessity for planned water resources.  Financing water supply scheme and development in tropical Africa.  Urban and rural water supplies, planning and execution of modern water schemes.  Sectoral approach to water resources planning. Effects of variations in water demand on design capacities of different components of water scheme.  Water demand and supply forecasting.  Water supplies of small communities in rural areas.  Planning and preparing water supply projects.  Water management options for urban and rural water demand and supply in tropical Africa.  Water pollution and quality control measures for municipal and industrial water supplies.

 

GME 425:       Environmental Resource Management (2 Credits)

Evaluation of the environment as actual or potential resource and methods of exploitation, purposes and approaches to resource conservation and management, the implications of the monistic nature of the environmental system in conservation planning, environmental units as multiple resources, conflict inherent in natural resource conservation and management, principles relating to watershed, game, fisheries, forestry and range management, environment for recreation.

 

GME 427:       Applied  Meteorology (2 Credits)

Trends in the study of tropical weather systems.  Recent advances in the study of low latitude weather systems.  The mean state of the tropical atmosphere.  The major producing systems in the tropics; tropical cyclones, tornadoes, monsoon depressions, thunderstorms and synoptic disturbances in the tropics.  The disturbance line of West Africa.  Inter-tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Models of prediction in the tropics – the single and multi-level methods.

 

GME 428:       Political Geography (2 Credits)

Spatial variations in inter-relationships of political activities and systems.  Significance of the geographical background to political situation. Nature and objectives of political geography. Classical political geography featuring environmental/possibilistic concepts.  Political process, perception, and decision-making. Boundaries in internal, international relations. Economic and political unions. Aspects of the political geography of Africa.  Evaluation of politico-geographic entity.  Politics of resources distribution and allocation.  Introduction to electoral geography. Local Government and geographic relationships.  Metropolitan/urban political organization.  Problems of national integration.

 

GME 429:       Moonson Meteorology (2 Credits)

Definition and application of synoptic meteorology, techniques adopted in synoptic weather analysis. Acquisition of synoptic weather analysis. Acquisition of synoptic data. Field observations, synoptic weather systems in West Africa. Easterly and Westerly waves. The Inter-tropical Discontinuity (ITD), thunder storms, linesquarall, duststoms and snow storms.

 

GME 431:       Numerical Weather Prediction (2 Credits)

Simple numerical methods of predicting weather. Concepts and practice of micro, macro-weather prediction. Instrumentation and weather prediction case studies. Significance and implications.

 

GME  432:      Demography (2 Credits)

Definition of terms. Demographic data evaluation: assessment of demographic data, detection of errors in population census and vital registration data and methods of reducing these errors.  Demographic estimation: the use of the stable, stationary and quasi-stable models in obtaining demographic parameters.  Brass and other techniques for computing fertility and mortality, methods of constructing life tables.  Population projections, population theories, population trends and policies.

 

GME 433:       Quantitative Techniques in Geography and Environmental Planning II

                        (2 Credits)

Time series analysis, Network analysis. Non-parametric analysis, Sign test, Mann Whitney U-test, Kruskal Wallis one way analysis of variance, by Ranks. Introduction to principal component analysis and factors analysis.  Introduction to discriminant. Function analysis and Canonical analysis.

 

GME 435:       Urban Environmental Problems (2 Credits)

Urban environmental sanitation, urban pollution; industrial, automobile and noise pollution; urban transportation; urban services delivery water, telephone etc. Urban housing problems, urban management problems; and urban physical deterioration: urban population and employment problems, etc.

 

GME 437:       Tourism and Recreation Management (2 Credits)

Scope and content of tourism and recreation management, aesthetic factors for parks planning, camp sites and recreation, urban recreation, wildlife and nature preservation, tourist and recreation development in Nigeria; tourist and recreation services in Nigeria; transport, security and recreation resource management.  Recreation sites and landscaping.

 

GME 438:       Special Topics in Meteorology (2 Credits)

Stratospheric ozone depletion, El Nino and La Nina phenomena relationship with tropical cyclone in the tropics and their typical global impacts.  Application of tropical weather systems to human health, food and water supply, building designs and urban planning.  Global climate change and tropical climate.  Drought and desertification in the tropics.

GME 439:       Forestry Economics and Wildlife Policy, Law & Administration (2 Credit Hours)

Forestry status of Nigeria.  Forestry utility. Forestry management economics and planning systems; operations planning and method of forest management.  Nigerian forest policy. Afforestation programmes in Nigeria (the tree planting exercise).  Forest policy and integrated land use. Agro forestry. Threat to forest-air pollution, bush burning, deforestation, poverty, overgrazing. Forestry in rural development and integrated watershed management. Forestry and landscaping-recreation, ecotourism, agricultural and aesthetics management. Forest institutions and administration. Forestry law in Nigeria. Wild life management. Objectives, principles and methods of wild life management.  

 

GME 442:       Environmental Hazards and Disaster Management (2 Credits)

Natural hazards, nature, causes and effects of soil and coastal erosion, drought, floods: riverine and urban; tropical cyclones and storms, earthquakes and landslides; volcanic eruptions, copous examples of environmental hazards and disasters; management of hazards and disasters; disaster control agencies e.g. Erosion or Ecological Agencies, NGOs etc.

 

GME 445:       Agro-Meteorology (2 Credits)

Agrometeorology, case studies, impact of climate on agricultural patterns in Nigeria; Agricultural problems connected with weather and climate and ameliorative technologies. These include low rainfall, drought, flood and associated soil erosion, desertification, storage problems, etc.

 

GME 447:       Climatological Pressure Systems (2 Credits)

Subtropical anticyclones; the upper westerlies; waves in the westerlies; Jet streams; zonal index; rain making experiments, air masses and frontal systems.

 

GME 449:       Agricultural Geography (2 Credits)

Classical agricultural location models, market system models, probability and behavioural models of agricultural typology, theoretical analysis of rural land use patterns, systems and settlements.  Origin and spread of agriculture using the diffusion theory.  Role of agriculture in national economic policies and strategies for agriculture development in Nigeria.

 

GME 451:       History of Geographic Thoughts (2 Credits)

History of geographic thoughts in relation to the history of science, the major traditions of Geography; classical geographic thought, Egyptians to Roman thought, medieval geographic thought, the age of discovery and its influence on geographic thought, eighteenth and nineteenth century geographic thought, the French and German Schools of thought, early twentieth century geographic thought including Russian and Nigerian schools of Geography.

 

GME 452:       Contemporary Philosophy and Methodology in Geography (2 Credits)

Current methodological approaches to geographic research, geography as an empirical science. Geography and cognate disciplines. Quantification in geography; classification in geography; explanations in geography; theories and models in geography; system analysis; philosophical basis of contemporary geographical concepts; development of philosophy of geography in Nigeria.

 

GME 454:       Arid and Semi-Arid Hydrology (2 Credits)

Delimitation of arid and semi-arid regions of Africa. Basic concepts ecology of Sahel zone. Geomorphology and physiograph, surface water bodies, geology, and ground water potentials. Effects of dam on hydrologic environments. Problems of drought. Case studies.

 

GME 456A:    Climatic Geomorphology (2 Credits)

Review of the concept of climatic geomorphology. The bioclimatic framework of the humid and semi-seasonally humid tropics arid regions weathering and climate. Tropical landscape and their interpretation (humid tropics). Pleistocene and Halocene climate. Tropical landforms. Arid and semi-arid landform, peri-glacial landforms. Nigerian landforms and their interpretation.

 

GME 456B:    Applied Geomorphology (2 Credits)

Geomorphology in engineering and economic geology, and environmental management in the tropics. Principles and methods of applied Geomorphology.  Geomorphic resources (rock etc) and economic activity.  Simulation models of geomorphic landscapes. Landscape assessment.

 

GME 456C:    Fluvial Geomorphology (2 Credits)

Characteristics of drainage basin. Analysis of drainage basin forms and processes. Spatial and temporal processes. Drainage basin hygrometry, principles of hydrometeorology.  Hydrograph analysis. Basin yield small and large instrumented watershed. Drainage basin modeling. Floods.

 

GME 458:       Urbanization Processes (2 Credits)

Definitional perspective, urbanization processes; spatio-temporal trends in urbanization; cities as systems and changes, rank-size distribution of cities; theoretical study of urban spatial structure, urban hierarchy and spheres of influence; urban  land use types; urban services and management in Nigeria.

 

GME 461:       Geographic Information Systems I (2 Credits)

Origin and historical development of Geographic Information System; Definition and conceptual foundation of GIS; components of GIS; functions of GIS; Geographic data and files; Data mode; Attribute files; Application in Urban and Regional planning.

 

GME 462:       Geographic Information Systems II (2 Credits)

Environmental management and GIS, Development in Environmental management in the era of GIS; Data types and sources; Application of GIS in remote sensing and cartography; Application of GIS in meteorology, implementation and utilization in weather related operations, decision-making and problem solving in meteorology; problems and prospects of GIS in Nigeria.

 

GME 464        Transportation and Environment (2 Credits)

Scope and content of transport geography.  Theories of transportation and models of transportation development and planning, flow analysis; transport modes and cost structure; urban transportation and population, transport demand studies; land use problems, accident studies – environmental safety; parking and parking problems; traffic congestion; air pollution; solutions to urban traffic congestion; engineering problems; integrated transport planning and problems in developing countries.

 

GME 466:       Industrial Geography (2 Credits)

Examination and analysis of the theoretical framework for the processes of industrial location. Potentials, processes and problems of industrial development in Nigeria.  Structural characteristics of manufacturing industrial concentration, industrial estates and migration. Theories of transportation and models of transactional flow analysis. Gravity model, intervening opportunity model, Reilly’s law of retail gravitation and Ravenstein’s law of migration.  Structural analysis of transport network, models of transportation, urban transport development.

 

GME 476:       Operational Meteorology (2 Credits)

Organization of U.S. Weather Bureau, British Meteorology services, Nigerian. Meteorological services for purposes of data collection, presentation, interpretation, forecasting and publishing, the national development, and international co-operation.

 

GME 472:       Systematic Geography of Nigerian Development (2 Credits)

A thematic approach to the geography of Nigeria focusing on a range of physical and human phenomena; spatial pattern; ecological zones; growth and distribution of population; natural resource bases; agricultural production and marketing systems; industrialization; transport development; internal and external exchange. Concepts and models, river basins; city and community regions; migration flows; urban systems; modernization, development strategies.

 

GME 473:       The Developed World (2 Credits)

Differentiation of the developed world from the developing world. Distribution of income and the standards of living. Social, economics and political frameworks of the capitalist and centrally planned states.  The historical evolution of the developed economies. Geographical basis of the economies of Western Europe; USA, and USSR; growth and performance of Agriculture, manufacturing and services. International trade and implications on the world economy.

 

GME 474:       The Developing World (2 Credits)

The nature of underdevelopment in the third World. Poverty and income distribution. Production systems and links with the international economy. Geographical distribution of natural resources, human resources and technology. Development strategies, agriculture, industrialization, education and manpower development. The population problem, international trade and transfer of resources.

 

GME 478:       Medical Geography  (2 Credits)

Scope and content of medical geography; spatial analysis of disease patterns and distribution; ecology of diseases – infections, nutritional and genetic diseases; spatial health planning and disease control; Health delivery and inter-disciplinary approach in medical research.

 

GME 481:       Micro Meteorology (2 Credits)

Concepts and practice of micro-meteorology; solar and thermal forcing functions of atmospheric processes near the ground; eddy diffusivities of heat; momentum; water vapour and carbon dioxide in the lower atmosphere (including soil and vegetation); measurement of meteorological parameters near the ground, urban micro-technology.

 

GME 482:       Urban Geography (2 Credits)

Defining urban areas, historical perspective on the city (evolution of cities, theory of origin of cities, areas of city origin, spread of urban life before industrial revolution, pre-industrial city, incidence of pre-industrial city in Africa, their functional structure – the Nigerian example). Patterns of modern global urbanization especially in developing countries. Urban-rural interface. Urban economy, urban demographic characteristics. Classification of cities – descriptive, statistical, multivariate analysis. Theories and empirical studies of urban systems. Urbanization and the urban system in Nigeria. urban ecology, interval structure of the city. Study of urban land uses with emphasis on Nigeria-residential, commercial, industrial and transportation.  Principles and techniques of urban land use planning. Urbanization problems in Nigeria and their solutions.

 

GME 486:       Regional Planning Models (2 Credits)

Scope and objectives of regional planning, geographical perception of a region, functional, administrative and planning region; theoretical basis of regional planning regional planning; growth pole center and growth-axis hypotheses, economic versus geographic space, core-periphery model, cumulative causation model; export base theory; input – output access and multipliers.  Strategies and problems of regional development in Nigeria.

 

GME 488:       Rural Geography, Development and Planning  (2 Credits)

Theories of rural settlement origin, evolution and location. Dynamics of development of rural settlement. Types, patterns of rural settlement and rural central places. Rural land resources and management. Rural population and land use. Rural industrialization. Afforestation. Institutions for rural development and planning (farm settlements ADPS, DFRRI, BETTER LIFE, Integrated Rural Development, Co-operatives, Town Unions, Age Grade, Public Parastatals and Boards, Community Self-help Schemes etc).  Growth pole theory.

 

GME 491:       Original Research Project (2 Credits)

Approximately 10,000 word research essay/project based on field and/or library research.

 

2008/2009 COURSE ALLOCATION FOR POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMME

 

1.         Postgraduate Diploma (PGD) Programme

A.        Full Time: First Semester

Course Code

Compulsory Common Courses

Lecturer

GME  501

Computer Techniques in Geography

SAMUEL OKIDE

GME  511

Research Methods in Geography

C.I.  ENETE

GME  507

Field Survey and Mapping

DEPT. COORDINATOR

GME  502

Contemporary Geography

DR. E.A. OBIENUSI

 

15 Units of Courses from the areas of specialization

 

 

ELECTIVES

Course Code

Courses from Physical/Human/Environmental Mgt Option (Area of Specialization)

Lecturer

GME  521

Population and Environment

DR. E.A. OBIENUSI

GME  577

Land Use Management

DR. E.A. OBIENUSI

GME  516

Soil and Vegetation Processes

DR. J.C. OKONKWO

GME  506

Introduction to Cartography

H.O. AHIADU

GME  561

Fluvial Geomorphology

B.O. OSUIWU

GME  517

Introduction to GIS

H.O. AHIADU

GME  512

Industrial Geography

DR. E.A. OBIENUSI

GME  513

Political Geography

DR. E.A. OBIENUSI

GME  554

Biogeography

B.O. OSUIWU

GME  531

Intro. To Urban Geography

N.I. IGU

GME  532

Intro. To Regional Planning

N.I. IGU

 

B.        Full Time: Second Semester

Course Code

Compulsory Common Courses

Lecturer

GME  578

Quantitative Techniques in Geography

C.I.  ENETE

GME  505

Environmental Psychology

DR. E.A. OBIENUSI

GME  546

Introduction to Environmental Impact Assessment

PROF. L.N. MUOGHALU

GME  591

Research Project

Dept. Assigns Supervisor

 

12 Units of Courses from the areas of Specialization

 

 

ELECTIVES

 

Course Code

Courses from Physical/Human/Environmental  Mgt Option (Area of Specialization)

Lecturer

GME  527

Air Photographs and Satellite Remote Sensing

PROF. J.I.  IGBOKWE

GME  585

Environmental Problems in Nigeria

DR. E.A. OBIENUSI

GME  504

Climatology and Climate Change

B.O. OSUIWU

GME  563

Agricultural Geography

H.O. AHIADU

GME  522

Rural Development Studies

H.O. AHIADU

GME  541

Environmental Hazards and Disasters

DR. E.A. OBIENUSI

GME  564

Technology, Energy and Development

I. OKONKWO (MRS)

GME  523

Transportation and Environment

DR. E.A. OBIENUSI

GME  552

Environmental Resources Management

H.O. AHIADU

GME  542

Approaches to Pollution Control

I. OKONKWO (MRS)

GME  524

Environmental Economics

DR. E.A. OBIENUSI

 2.         Masters Degree Programme (M.Sc.)

A.        Full Time:  First Semester

Course Code

Compulsory Common Courses

Lecturer

GME  611

Perspective on Geography (Theory & Research Methods)

PROF. L.N. MUOGHALU

GME  601

Computer and Statistical Applications in Geography

DR. K.C. AGBASI

GME  609

M.Sc. Seminars I; & II (Research Proposal)

DEPT. COORDINATOR

GME  603

Theory and Research Methods

C.I.  ENETE

 

12 Units of Courses from the areas of specialization

 

 

ELECTIVES

 

Course Code

Courses from Physical/Human/Environmental Mgt Option (Area of Specialization)

 

Lecturer

GME  613

Geography & Public Policy

PROF. L.N. MUOGHALU

GME  614

Applied Political Geography

PROF. L.N. MUOGHALU

GME  605

Environmental Perception

DR. E.A. OBIENUSI

GME  604

Applied Climatology & Meteorology

B.O.  OSUIWU

GME  662

Biogeographical Analysis

B.O.  OSUIWU

GME  661

River Basin Studies

C.I.  ENETE

GME  616

Advanced Soil Geography

DR. J.C. OKONKWO

GME  612

Industrialization and Regional Development

DR. E.A. OBIENUSI

GME  623

Transport Analysis

DR. E.A. OBIENUSI

GME  624

Environmental Economics

DR. E.A. OBIENUSI

GME  621

Population and Environment

DR. E.A. OBIENUSI

GME  617

Geographic Information System

PROF. J.I.  IGBOKWE

GME  663

Agricultural Geography

H.O. AHIADU

GME  651

Forestry Economics & Management

PROF. L.N. MUOGHALU

GME  652

Environmental Resources Management

H.O. AHIADU

GME  646

Environmental Impact Analysis

PROF. L.N. MUOGHALU

 

B.        Full Time:  Second Semester

Course Code

Compulsory Common Courses

Lecturer

GME  691

M.Sc. Thesis

Dept. Assigns Supervisor

 

6 Units of Courses from the areas of specialization

 

 

ELECTIVES

 

Course Code

Courses from Physical/Human/Environmental Mgt Option (Area of Specialization)

Lecturer

GME  606

Environmental Laws

N.G.  EZEABASILI

GME  631

Urbanization and Environment

DR. E.A. OBIENUSI

GME  632

Urban Climatology

C.I. ENETE

GME  618

Technology, Energy and Environment

I. OKONKWO (MRS)

GME  641

Agroclimatology

C.I. ENETE

GME  648

Environmental Pollution Management

I. OKONKWO (MRS)

GME  671

Remote Sensing for Geographical Research

PROF. J.I. IGBOKWE

GME  664

Hydrology and Water Resources Management

C.I.  ENETE

GME  672

Rural Systems Analysis

H.O. AHIADU

 3.         Doctor of Philosophy Programme (Ph.D.)

            Year I: Full Time

A.        First Semester:

Course Code

Compulsory Common Courses

Lecturer

GME  711

Theory and Methods of Geographical Research

PROF. L.N. MUOGHALU

GME  701

Ph.D. Seminar I

DEPT. COORDINATOR

GME  771

Applied Internet Geography   I

AFRIHUB ASSIGNS

 

6 Units of M.Sc. Courses if not covered, from areas of specialization

 

 

B.        Second Semester

Course Code

Compulsory Common Courses

Lecturer

GME  778

Quantitative Techniques in Geographical Research

C.I.  ENETE

GME  702

Doctoral Seminar II (Research Proposal)

Pre-requisite to GME 709

DEPT. COORDINATOR

GME  772

Environmental and Planning Laws

N.G.  EZSEABASILI

 

6 Units of M.Sc. Courses if not covered, from areas of specialization

 

 

Year II: Full Time

A.        First Semester

Course Code

Compulsory Common Courses

Lecturer

GME  709

Seminar III (Pre-requisite to GME 791)

Dept. Coordinator

GME  791

Doctoral Dissertation

Dept. Assigns Supervisor

 

B.        Second Semester

Course Code

Compulsory Common Courses

Lecturer

GME  791

 Doctoral Dissertation

Dept. Assigns Supervisor